Turabian style

 

Turabian style and scope of its application

 

“Turabian Style” named after the author of Kate L. Turabian (1893-1987 gg.), She has developed it for the University of Chicago. Except some differences, Turabian style – it’s the same as that of Chicago style citation. However, Chicago style is a guide to publications in general, whereas the “Guide for compilers research, theses and dissertations” K. Turabian is an instruction for the preparation and presentation of student works and dissertations.

 

From such styles as style MLA (Modern Language Association) and APA (American Psychological Association), Turabian style is different in that is designed for the works to be used by a narrow audience, not published. From the style of MLA it is also different is that on the basis of style MLA prepared works as graduate students, doctors, scientists and professional writers, while Turabin style can be used as a master’s degree candidates and doctoral degrees, as well as the junior courses students.

 

Turabian style format

 

This style is allowed to use two basic systems of citing sources and references to quotes: format “notes-bibliography” (or a simple bibliographic style) and format of the “author-date”. These formats generally are the same policies quotes, which is described in Chicago style guide, but they take into account and requirements for student work.
Bibliographic style is mainly used in the literature, history and art. This style is the bibliographic information in the footnotes on the page, or endnotes, and usually in the bibliography. A more detailed style “author-date” is used in the exact and social sciences. In this system, the sources should be briefly shown in brackets in the text by author and date of publication. Links to the source in parentheses extended full bibliographic information in the section of the paper “sources used.” In addition to the use of endnotes as opposed to links in brackets in the text, otherwise both systems has similar style.

 

 

Detailed Description of format in Turabian style

 

The format of “footnotes, bibliography”: a simple citation

 

The following examples illustrate the citation in accordance with this format. After the example of the footnote should be a shortened version of a reference to the same source in footnotes. (Short version is used for re-mention of the source text, if one source is cited several times). Then below is an example of how power should be issued in the bibliographical work list.

 

Quoting the book

 

One author

 

1. Malcolm Gladwell, the inflection point is: How small details can create large differences (Boston: Little, Brown, 2000), 54-55.

2. Gladwell, the inflection point 73.

Gladwell, Malcolm. The inflection point: How small details can create big differences. Boston: Little, Brown, 2000.

 

Two or more authors

 

1. Peter Mori and Amina Yaqin, Framing Muslims: Stereotyping and the image after 9/11 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011), 54.

2. Mori and Yakin, Framing Muslims, 70-72.

Mori, Peter, and Amina Yaqin. Muslims Framing: Stereotypes and image after 9/11. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011.

 

Four or more authors

 

List all the authors in the bibliography. In a footnote should indicate only the first author and add after “et al.”:

1. Jay M. Bernstein and others, art and aesthetics after Adorno (Berkeley: University of California, 2010). 256.

2. Bernstein et al., The Art and Aesthetics, 17.

Bernstein, Jay M., Claudia Brodsky, J. Anthony. Cascardi, Thierry de Duve, Ales Eryavich, Robert Kaufman, and Fred Rush. Art and Aesthetics After Adorno. Berkeley: University of California, 2010.

 

Editor or translator, instead of the author

 

1. Richmond Lattimore translation, Homer’s Iliad (Chicago: University of Chicago, 1951)., 81-82.
2. Lattimore, Iliad, 34.

Lattimore, Richmond, translation. Homer’s Iliad. Chicago: University of Chicago, 1951.

 

Editor or translator, in addition to the author

 

1. Jane Austen, Persuasion: The edition with notes, ed. Robert Morrison (Cambridge, MA: Belknap Publisher Harvard University, 2011), 311-14.

2. Austin, Persuasion, 315.

 

The format of “author-date”: a simple citation

 

The following examples illustrate the citation format using the “author-date”. Each example of how power should be presented in the section “References to the sources” is accompanied by an example of registration of citations in the text.

 

Quoting the book

 

One author

 

1. Gladwell, Malcolm. 2002. The inflection point: How small details can create big differences. Boston: Little, Brown.

2. (Gladwell 2000, 74-75)

 

Two or more authors

 

1. Mori, Peter, and Amina Yaqin. 2011. Framing Muslims: Stereotyping and the image after 9/11. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

2. (Mori and Yakin 2011, 42)

 

Four or more authors

 

If four or more authors should list them all in the “References” section. The text specifies only the first author and “et al.”:

 

1. Bernstein, Jay M., Claudia Brodsky, J. Anthony. Cascardi, Thierry de Duve, Ales Eryavich, Robert Kaufman, and Fred Rush. Art and Aesthetics After Adorno. Berkeley: University of California, 2010.

2. (Bernstein et al. 2010, 256)

 

Editor or translator, instead of the author

 

1. Lattimore, Richmond, translation. 1951. Homer’s Iliad. Chicago: University of Chicago.

2. (Lattimore 1951, 81-82)

 

Editor or translator, in addition to the author

 

1. Austin, Jane.2011. Persuasion: The edition with notes, edited by Robert Morrison. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Publisher Harvard University.

2. (Austin 2011, 341-342).

 

Kate L. Turabian